Equity-Line-Draft-1-1

The Equity Line contains original analyses, commentary, and “on the ground” stories of students, parents, educators, and activists all over the nation striving to improve education. It chronicles our efforts, as well as those of partners and friends who are working toward the shared goal of closing gaps.

  • Teaching Vocab in a Way That Sticks

    April 21, 2015 by

    If students are going to be able to make sense of what they’re reading, express themselves, or interpret phrases used figuratively or symbolically, they need to know a wide range of words. But research shows that low-income students often come to school with a smaller vocabulary than their…

  • Why Teach Where I Teach: Diversity With Splash of Arts Integration

    April 13, 2015 by

    This post is a part of an ongoing series, called “Why I Teach Where I Teach,” which asks educators in high-need schools to share what has attracted (and kept) them in the challenging environments they’re in. They share important stories and experiences that should remind us all of…

  • Teachers as Civic Leaders

    April 10, 2015 by

    Faced with sniffling kindergarteners who can barely sit in their chairs, it can sometimes be difficult to see them as responsible adults 12 years hence; even high school kids, much closer to adulthood, often undermine themselves with goofiness or obduracy. But when I talk with highly successful educators, they…

  • The FASFA Divide: Getting More Low-Income Students to Apply for Aid

    April 8, 2015 by

    Almost 20 percent of students with family incomes low enough to qualify for a Pell Grant never even apply. And many more students who qualify for other types of financial aid are missing out, too, having never submitted their Free Application for Federal Student Aid. According to our analysis…

  • Is Funding in Your State Equitable? A Tour of Our New Data Tool

    April 6, 2015 by

    Recently, we released Funding Gaps 2015, along with an online data tool, which looks at local and state funding for high- and low-poverty school districts, as well as for districts with the most and fewest students of color. (Our analysis only focuses on state and local funding, as…

  • Traditional Autonomy Isn’t Necessarily Supportive

    March 30, 2015 by

    In Huffington Post this week I write about how most teachers think “supportive leadership” is very important to retaining good teachers. But what is supportive leadership? The term means different things to different people. For example, I know a high school principal who thinks he is being supportive by…

  • Why I Teach Where I Teach: To Give My Students the Same Opportunities My Teachers Gave Me

    March 30, 2015 by

    This post is a part of an ongoing series, called “Why I Teach Where I Teach,” which asks educators in high-need schools to share what has attracted (and kept) them in the challenging environments they’re in. They share important stories and experiences that should remind us all of…

  • Persistent Inequities in School Funding: A Q&A with Natasha Ushomirsky

    March 25, 2015 by and

    Today, Ed Trust released Funding Gaps 2015, a new report and online data tool, which compares local and state funding among school districts (1) with the highest and lowest poverty and (2) those that serve the most and the fewest students of color. The results show funding gaps continue to…

  • Between the Echoes: Right Place, Right Time

    March 23, 2015 by

    An offshoot of Ed Trust’s Echoes From the Gap series, drawing stories of students from behind the statistics, this blog series shares shorter narratives — brief glimpses into classrooms and hallways — that give readers an opportunity to examine educator practices and policies through the intimate lens of student experience. All…

  • Senate and House Republican Budget Proposals: Protecting Pell Not A Priority  

    March 20, 2015 by

    D.C. insiders know that the congressional budget proposals don’t have the force of law. However, these proposals should not be summarily dismissed, as they set forth Republican priorities. And unfortunately, it looks like the Pell Grant program, which supports low- and moderate-income student access to…

  • What Does a DTM Principal Brag About?

    March 20, 2015 by

    Principals of schools that have earned our Dispelling the Myth Award are a very diverse group and don’t really share many outward characteristics — they are male, female, black, white, Hispanic, Asian. But they all have a deep, abiding belief that all of their students can meet high standards, and…

  • Debunking Myths in NH’s New Assessment Pilot

    March 18, 2015 by

    Contrary to news headlines, the U.S. Department of Education hasn’t approved local assessments to take the place of the statewide tests in New Hampshire. Instead, it approved piloting of a new, statewide assessment model — and that’s a critical distinction, especially as a few members of Congress…

  • Calling All Teachers of Color

    March 18, 2015 by and

    Nearly half of public school students are of color, but only 18 percent of teachers are. Why is that? The trouble is that answer isn’t clear. We know that greater diversity in the teaching workforce would provide students, who may be insulated from people of differing racial/ethnic…

  • NYC’s Teacher Tenure Reform: Good or Bad for Equity?

    March 17, 2015 by

    Five years ago, New York City began providing data — including evaluation scores — to principals about their tenure candidates. Principals could use that information to decide whether to approve or deny tenure — or simply extend the decision another year, in cases where teachers hadn’t yet demonstrated their full potential.…

  • What Schools Can Do

    March 16, 2015 by

    George Hall Elementary School was recently the subject of an online discussion, which I write about this week in Huffington Post. That prompted me to think about the first time I ever went to George Hall Elementary School in Mobile, Ala., when I stumbled onto its annual writing fair.…

  • Why I Teach Where I Teach: The Opportunity to Rebuild a School

    March 16, 2015 by

    This post is a part of an ongoing series, called “Why I Teach Where I Teach,” which asks educators in high-need schools to share what has attracted (and kept) them in the challenging environments they’re in. They share important stories and experiences that should remind us all of…

  • In Their Words: ‘I, Too, Am B-CC’

    March 11, 2015 by

    During our research for “Falling Out of the Lead,” the third report in our Shattering Expectations series, we interviewed high-achieving, low-income students to better understand how their high schools prepared them for college. In this post, a reprise to our four-part blog series, we share how some…

  • Why I Teach Where I Teach: The Opportunity to Make a Difference

    March 2, 2015 by

    This post is a part of an ongoing series, called “Why I Teach Where I Teach,” which asks educators in high-need schools to share what has attracted (and kept) them in the challenging environments they’re in. They share important stories and experiences that should remind us all of…

  • Between the Echoes: What He Learned at School

    February 23, 2015 by

    An offshoot of Ed Trust’s Echoes From the Gap series, drawing stories of students from behind the statistics, this blog series shares shorter narratives — brief glimpses into classrooms and hallways — that give readers an opportunity to examine educator practices and policies through the intimate lens of student experience. All…

  • Bridging the Gap ‘Between Helplessness and Hope’

    February 19, 2015 by

    Once a year during the National Title I Association conference, thousands of people from schools and districts that receive this federal money converge to talk about the requirements of the law and ideas to improve the education of poor children. The law in question, of course, is the Elementary and…