Equity-Line-Draft-1-1

The Equity Line contains original analyses, commentary, and “on the ground” stories of students, parents, educators, and activists all over the nation striving to improve education. It chronicles our efforts, as well as those of partners and friends who are working toward the shared goal of closing gaps.

  • Higher Education's Critical Role in Increasing Opportunity in America

    February 12, 2016 by and

    Board members who want to be great stewards of the institutions they are entrusted to lead — today and into the future — must ensure two things: that they truly understand what the numbers say about their institution’s contributions to restoring opportunity in America and that they have capable leadership teams…

  • This Fall, Don’t Short Pell Students

    February 9, 2016 by

    It’s 2016 — an election year. It is the last year that President Obama will submit a budget to Congress, while issues of student loan debt and college costs are being discussed broadly on the campaign trail and at kitchen tables across the country. But even with these political dynamics…

  • Lessons From ‘Butterfly Gardens’

    February 8, 2016 by

    As we prepare to release the fourth installment of Ed Trust’s Echoes from the Gap series, I am excited to introduce readers to five extraordinary young men and women I had the pleasure to spend time with, as well as the dedicated educators in the three alternative settings in…

  • Honoring Native American Language and Culture to Raise Achievement

    January 28, 2016 by

    Samantha Wauls was an intern at Ed Trust through December 2015. She previously taught high school English and third grade on her maternal grandmother’s tribal homeland, the Lower Brule Sioux Reservation. Though only in middle school, my brother Charlie has already had school experiences where his racial and cultural…

  • Where Is All the Classroom Chatter?

    January 27, 2016 by

    Carlton Jordan, guest blogger, is an independent consultant who is working on our forthcoming revised Assignments Analysis framework. He was also previously a senior associate for Ed Trust during our early Standards in Practice work. Students can do no better than the assignments and instruction they’re given. That’s…

  • Between the Echoes: Where the Clocks Stand Still

    January 19, 2016 by

    An offshoot of Ed Trust’s Echoes From the Gap series, drawing stories of students from behind the statistics, this blog series shares shorter narratives — brief glimpses into classrooms and hallways — that give readers an opportunity to examine educator practices and policies through the intimate lens of student experience. All…

  • Two Dispelling the Myth Principals Talk About Believing in Kids

    January 4, 2016 by

    I was lucky enough to speak a few weeks ago at Learning Forward, an organization dedicated to the professional growth and development of educators. It was great to talk with a group of educators dedicated to professional learning. But even better was that two principals about whom I have written…

  • ESSA: Just a Big Present to Adult Interests? Think Again!

    December 10, 2015 by

    This op-ed first appeared at The Hechinger Report. President Obama just signed a new version of the nation’s main K-12 education law, passed by overwhelming bipartisan majorities in both chambers of Congress. From news accounts, it would be all-too-easy to conclude that the Every Student…

  • Belief in Students Drives Success

    December 3, 2015 by

    I have become convinced that the main reason some schools can be successful with students whom other schools would write off is that the teachers and administrators have an almost infinite belief in students’ capacity to learn and grow. Belief isn’t magic — alone it doesn’t transform anything. But…

  • A Decade of Gains and Gaps in College Graduation Rates: A Q&A With Kimberlee Eberle-Sudré

    December 2, 2015 by and

    Today, we released a new analysis, looking at a decade of graduation rates at four-year, public institutions. The report — titled Rising Tide: Do College Grad Rate Gains Benefit All Students? — shows that the majority of institutions have made improvements in these last 10 years, but those improvements don’t…

  • Teacher Vacancies: Hard to Staff, But Not Impossible

    December 1, 2015 by

    As part of our ongoing work with districts that are working to fix inequitable staffing patterns, we recently checked in with a human capital officer in a large, urban district. Referring to a handful of predominantly black and Latino schools, he said: “These schools have a lot of trouble attracting…

  • How Policy Can Help Principals Help Kids

    November 30, 2015 by

    Earlier this month, our own Sonja Santelises led a conversation with state and district leaders about the critical importance of principals and how policymakers can help ensure that every school — especially those educating large numbers of low-income students and students of color — has a strong, well-supported principal. Drawing…

  • Hey Mizzou, It’s Time to Step Up

    November 23, 2015 by

    Now that the University of Missouri’s president has resigned and the chancellor has announced that he'll step down at the end of the year, hopefully students’ concerns will be addressed. Of all Concerned Student 1950’s list of demands, there is one that particularly impressed me because of…

  • Turns Out — Who Knew? — Strong State Accountability Systems Might Even Be Helpful

    November 18, 2015 by

    A day after this year’s disappointing results from the National Assessment of Educational Progress were released, Stanford economist Martin Carnoy published a new analysis of NAEP data that should start some new lines of thinking. Carnoy and a couple of his colleagues looked at NAEP data from 1992…

  • Why Common Core Math Standards Aren’t As Fuzzy As Some Say

    November 6, 2015 by

    Some of the criticism of Common Core State Standards has focused on what some call “fuzzy math.” That is, Common Core standards clearly state that students should have a conceptual understanding of mathematics and encourage teachers to help students explore different ways to solve problems. That’s the fuzzy math…

  • We All Deserve to Know Grad Rates for Pell Students

    November 4, 2015 by

    Like many students, my college decision was based largely on the price I would have to pay — tuition, financial aid, and in-state vs. out-of-state costs all had an influence. However, there was one other factor I should have paid close attention to — one that would have solidified…

  • Between the Echoes: AP Hunger Games

    November 2, 2015 by

    An offshoot of Ed Trust’s Echoes From the Gap series, drawing stories of students from behind the statistics, this blog series shares shorter narratives — brief glimpses into classrooms and hallways — that give readers an opportunity to examine educator practices and policies through the intimate lens of student experience. All…

  • The ‘Sobering’ News in Today’s NAEP Results

    October 28, 2015 by

    After years of improvement for low-income students and students of color, today’s National Assessment of Educational Progress results show that, in some grades and subjects, performance has stalled or fallen. “Any way you look at it, today’s NAEP results are sobering,” our president, Kati Haycock, said…

  • What You Should Look for in the NAEP Results

    October 27, 2015 by

    All of us at Ed Trust are eagerly awaiting tomorrow’s release of the 2015 National Assessment of Educational Progress data, which will let us see how fourth- and eighth-graders across the nation perform in reading and math. As we’ve noted before, NAEP lets us compare student achievement…

  • How Cognitive Science Came to the Field of Education

    October 26, 2015 by

    Back at the turn of the century, I was invited by a friend to a symposium by the National Academy of Sciences as it published a brand new book, How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience and School. I found myself mesmerized by the speakers who were talking about learning, memory…